PowerShell Port Scan

Check your Egress Filtering with a PowerShell port scan script

Firewall Egress Filtering Check with PowerShell

This is just a quick post so I can refer to myself more than anything regarding conducting a  Powershell Port Scan! However this is a useful couple of lines to to conduct a port scan from a windows device with PowerShell. This can be used in a number of situations however is especially ideal to check your egress filtering out to a server on the internet or to a segmented network. In the below few lines we are testing the first 1000 ports this can be bumped up to 65535 if wanted and the server that you are port scanning is listed as X.X.X.X.

This particular script has been pulled from Black Hills Information Security page here. An alternative from Microsoft’s ‘Hey, Scripting Guy! Blog’ can be found here.

The Common Problem

Often organisations lack adequate egress filtering, by this I mean outbound connects that can be established on a number of ports from within the heart of the network. Client machines and typical internal application servers don’t need to access a range of services out on the Internet. Once a nasty exploit has got an attacker onto a network they will look to get a foothold within the network lateral move and phone home to command and control server. Having a range of ports open to clients and servers allows attackers to make an outbound connects from whole host of tools, including PowerShell for that matter.

The Solution

Check you egress filtering and lock down any unwanted open ports out to the internet, your perimeter firewalls should not allow these outbound connections. Obviously certain services are going to need to make outbound connections such as web proxy and email gateways and these rules should be appropriately provisioned. To take this one step further enable your outbound firewall rules on your local hosts, ‘hang on a sec, you must be crazy’ I hear you say, however by doing this you will be help prevent the lateral movement of attackers through your network as well as being able to get off your network back out to the Internet.

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Cisco Access Control List Guidelines to follow when creating rules.

Cisco Access Control List Guidelines

Just a quick post to remind myself and others ofCisco Access Control List Guidelines. the following Cisco Access Control List Guidelines that we should be aware of. I thought this would be good to post as a quick reference/lookup. This just gives a basic run down of how ACL’s should be implemented as per Cisco CCNA Security.

  • Ensure the last ACE that is processed has a ‘deny any’ or ‘deny any any’
  • ACLs are processed top down, as soon as as an ACE is matched the processing is stopped.
  • Make sure the most specific ACEs are at the top of the list.
  • One ACL per interface, per protocol, per direction.
  • Any new ACE’s that are added to an ACL are added to the bottom by default, unless specified.
  • Router generated traffic is not filtered by outbound ACLs
  • Standard ACLs should be placed as close to the destination as possible.
  • Extended ACLs should be placed as close to the source as possible.
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CCNA Security – Implementing Cisco Network Security Lab

I thought I would share with you the Lab I have been mostly working with for CCNA  Security (CCNAS) – Implementing Cisco Network Security (210-260) exam that I have recently took and passed. I have also used several smaller lab setups for specific testing however this is the main lab to piece everything together.

CCNAS - Implementing Cisco Network Security Lab
CCNAS – Implementing Cisco Network Security Lab

The lab has been built to accommodate the many elements on the exam and covers off most of the practical procedures that you need to be comfortable with. Using GNS3 and VirtualBox we are able to lab most of the practical exercises bar the L2 switching portions which I achieved through physical equipment (Catalyst 3750, 3550 x2 and 2950 switches). The exam does cover many topics in theory that you must know, these aren’t covered here, however can be found on the Cisco website.

The lab contains several client machines for managing the routers and ASA firewalls from putty, cisco configuration professional and ASDM as well as testing PAT through the ASA with a breakout to the internet. There is an Active Directory Domain Controller with the Network Access Protection role installed for use with AAA/radius and NTP. A separate syslog server. A DMZ with web server for testing NAT and outside firewall rules. There is also an ASA 5520 at each of the three sites for testing VPN site-to-site Ipsec connections, clients at all sites for testing end to end connectivity. There is also an outside remote client for testing the Anyconnect and client-less vpn options which takes advantage of the AAA radius service.

Using this lab we are able to address the following practical elements for the CCNAS exam:

2.0 Secure Access

2.1   Secure management

  • 2.1.b Configure secure network management
  • 2.1.c Configure and verify secure access through SNMP v3 using an ACL
  • 2.1.d Configure and verify security for NTP
  • 2.1.e Use SCP for file transfer

2.2 AAA concepts

  • 2.2.b Configure administrative access on a Cisco router and ASA using RADIUS
  • 2.2.c Verify connectivity on a Cisco router and ASA to a RADIUS server
3.0 VPN

3.2 Remote access VPN

  • 3.2.a Implement basic clientless SSL VPN using ASDM
  • 3.2.b Verify clientless connection
  • 3.2.c Implement basic AnyConnect SSL VPN using ASDM
  • 3.2.d Verify AnyConnect connection
  • 3.2.e Identify endpoint posture assessment

3.3 Site-to-site VPN

  • 3.3.a Implement an IPsec site-to-site VPN with pre-shared key authentication on Cisco routers and ASA firewalls
  • 3.3.b Verify an IPsec site-to-site VPN
4.0 Secure Routing and Switching

4.1 Security on Cisco routers

  • 4.1.a Configure multiple privilege levels
  • 4.1.b Configure Cisco IOS role-based CLI access
  • 4.1.c Implement Cisco IOS resilient configuration

4.2 Securing routing protocols

  • 4.2.a Implement routing update authentication on OSPF
5.0 Cisco Firewall Technologies

5.3 Implement NAT on Cisco ASA 9.x

  • 5.3.a Static
  • 5.3.b Dynamic
  • 5.3.c PAT
  • 5.3.d Policy NAT
  • 5.3 e Verify NAT operations

5.4 Implement zone-based firewall

  • 5.4.a Zone to zone
  • 5.4.b Self zone

5.5 Firewall features on the Cisco Adaptive Security Appliance (ASA) 9.x

  • 5.5.a Configure ASA access management
  • 5.5.b Configure security access policies
  • 5.5.c Configure Cisco ASA interface security levels
  • 5.5.d Configure default Cisco Modular Policy Framework (MPF)

Well what next, CCNP Security of course.

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Linux Firewall

Linux FirewallCheck out the Linux Firewall mini setup guide which demonstrates the use of iptables in Linux. Here I demonstrate a few basic commands and rules and explained how we can allow and deny specific traffic on your Linux server. The scenario is for typical web server allowing only HTTP, HTTPS and SSH. Host based firewalls are often overlooked relying solely on perimeter defenses however are an important aspect of protecting your endpoint whether that is on a server or workstation. Iptables in built into Linux is a pretty capable command line based stateful firewall. Once you have the hang on the syntax it is fairly straightforward to implement and customize to your own requirements.

Linux Firewall iptables
Linux Firewall iptables

Click to check out the full Linux Firewall iptables mini guide here.

 

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